Training course on 18.03.2014 – Leicester

I’ve been working with WordPress since 2009 and have never looked back. You could too, by joining the next eBusiness WordPress training course in Leicester on Tuesday 18th March, 2014

How I got started with WordPress

My journey into the wonderful world of WordPress started while snowed-up in Scotland. I’d gone to visit friends and found myself unable to leave the place where I was staying due to a fall over 3ft of snow which turned the landscape into a beautiful scene, but incarcerated me in the apartment where I was staying for the best part of 4 days.

Not being one to get bored I decided that rather than watch the TV, or read a book, I’d learn something new. Being a web developer I’d read quite a bit about WordPress and decided my time could be well spent exploring a new area that normally I would be hard-pressed to find time to do.

Luckily the internet still worked and I was soon able to set up my first blog on WordPress.com. It took me a while to find my way around the Dashboard, learning to drive the installation, but I managed to publish my first post within a fairly short period of time, complete with photographs showing my snowy surroundings.

Since then I haven’t looked back. In fact it was only a couple of years later that I decided to concentrate on working with WordPress rather than continue with bespoke website development projects for clients. In a nutshell, WordPress provided everything my clients required to get them up and running on the web with a quality looking site/blog they could learn to run themselves.

Although I found it hard to admit, WordPress provided my clients with a potentially better web solution than I had been able to provide previously. Since then, as well as configuring sites for clients, I enjoy teaching others about WordPress – getting started.

WordPress.com-v-WordPress.org

Yes, there are two versions of WordPress, which many find quite confusing. I’ve written a blog post about the differences between WordPress.com and WordPress.org, which is worth scanning through.

If I’m working in a group teaching situation, over a day, then I’ll start attendees on WordPress.com because I can be confident that they’ll leave the course, course-book in hand, without having to worry about the security aspects that are the bane of WordPress.org installations. That’s not to say that WordPress.com is superior to WordPress.org, in fact the opposite is the case. The analogy I use is one of sailing dinghies. WordPress.com is about bobbing around within the harbour walls, WordPress.org is about dodging the big waves and shipping lanes at sea.

The beauty of WordPress is that you can start on WordPress.com and later migrate your site to WordPress.org. This allows everyone to get started with WordPress.com on learning the actual nuts and bolts of working with the CMS, content managed system, which will be almost exactly the same in WordPress.org. The other advantage of WordPress.com is that there’s no hosting to pay. So, all in all it gives everyone a chance to try out WordPress, free of charge, to see if they like what it can deliver. Those who take to the platform can then upgrade their installation, probably with a little help from a WordPress developer to smooth the transition.

You can learn to work with WordPress

The next training day is being run in Leicester on 18th March by the eBusiness Club. You can read more about getting started with WordPress and book a place You’ll be entering a world that presents more options than you could imagine for design and functionality to benefit your online marketing. Hope you can join us.

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